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Ari Snaevarsson

PN-certified Nutritionist, Diet tech/counselor (ED-specific), Author

Having competed twice in bodybuilding, which led to the onset of binge eating, I have recovered from my own eating disorder and want to give this gift to the world.  I have now studied eating disorder refeeding and psychotherapeutic strategies in depth, and I work both in the capacity as a nutritionist working directly with clients to help them achieve their goals and as a dietetic technician and counselor at a residential eating disorder treatment center.

My philosophy is simple: Eating was meant to be an enjoyable and intrinsically rewarding process.  It was through the malicious distortion of how we see our bodies and what we "should" or "should not" be eating that the diet industry was able to make a market off of our insecurities and desires to be happy and healthy.  To reverse that, we work on small, actionable goals in a systematic and organized framework that gets us to our goals without ever having to resort to restriction, calorie counting, or punitive exercise.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Highlights

  • Featured on the Sigma Nutrition podcast to discuss refeeding anorexic adolescents
  • Led webinar for Precision Nutrition on working with disordered eating clients
  • Worked with many clients suffering from eating disorders and have helped them reach recovery
  • Recovered from my own eating disorder
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From bodybuilding to body-loving

How the most judgmental sport in the world pushed me into the eating disorder field

Underlying psychological issues that led to an addictive, extreme, and obsessive personality (to the point of being diagnosed with OCD in high school) combined with the extreme rigidity and restriction of bodybuilding contest prep was a recipe for disaster.  Bodybuilding is a sport I've grown to love and hate.  It gave me purpose and was ultimately what brought me into the field of nutrition and health, but it also taught me to hate my body, obsess over food, and abuse stimulants.  You can read more about the binge eating I went through after my first show here.

It is because of these experiences I have had that I've been blessed, in an odd way, to see firsthand how unbelievably frightening and pathological an eating disorder can be.  It feels like you are alone in this, and like no matter what anybody tells you, you're never actually going to get better.  But, years later, I've not only recovered but learned to love my relationship with food and my body.  Having now also directly brought others to this place of ED remission, I feel encouraged and devoted to helping people escape this psychological prison and reclaim control.